Question: Which Way is a "Reversal" on a Sideways Card?

Hello r/tarot!

I am brand new to tarot reading… like I literally got my first deck (the Alleyman's Tarot) 2 days ago. I know it's a bit of an unusual deck, and a strange one for a first deck… but I'm a weird guy.

Anyway, the title of this post kinda says it all. I have been trying to figure out which way to read reversals on sideways cards, like in the Celtic Cross pattern.

I have seen some people say that because it is a cross card that the entire meaning of the card, reversal included, would apply to the card it crosses.

Other blogs and posts I have seen suggest that each reader should pick a system that is right for them and choose either right or left as being the "top" position for reading reversals, leaving the other side as the "bottom" so that when you flip the card over if the top of the CARD is in the "Top" position in your particular methodology then the card is right side up, if not, it's reversed.

Further still, I have heard from friends that there will always be some natural spin or shift to the card when laying it down, and the side of the card that rotates away from you should be read as being in the "top" position when determining reversals.

I guess I mostly want to know if there is any consensus to this at all? I'm not so sure which method I would prefer, but there is a small part of me leaning towards the "whole thing applies" or the "read the full card and consider the whole reading and apply the reversal if it seems appropriate or not" which is what I did last night during a reading for a friend, as the reversal seemed to tell a more provocative story and tied the whole thing together really well.

But clarity would be nice moving forward.

Thanks!

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Kerrie Mercel

Currently Kerrie Mercel, inspirational speaker, author & facilitator for the health and wellness industry. Kerrie enjoys working with professional business women helping them to find the power to live life on their terms.

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